Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Forensic Research & Technology San Antonio, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

George W Adams

University of North Texas, USA

Keynote: Value based leadership: Communicating through actions

Time : 09:50-10:15

OMICS International Forensic Research-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker George W Adams photo
Biography:

George W Adams was awarded a Master of Arts in Criminology and Criminal Justice, and also holds a Bachelor of Business Administration. Texas Commission on Law Enforcement certifies him as an Advanced Peace Officer. He is a member of Forensic Isotope Radio Mass Spectrometry Network (FIRMS). Currently he is NamUs Director of Financial Operations at the UNT Health Science Center, was an invited member of the original National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) Missing Person Advisory Group, and is co-author of the original grant for the Management and Support of NamUs (2011-MU-BX-K063) and has two extensions that totaled $7.55 million.

Abstract:

Past decades may provide evidence of a void in leadership in the criminal justice community as evidenced, in the U.S., by over 1,400 exonerations and existence tens of thousand of untested sexual assault kits with some dating back over twenty years. However, your actions by coming together at this Conference provide the nexus between values and leadership, which is the catalyst driving the power of innovation and collaboration to ease suffering around the globe. Values are not words showcased in mission and vision statements, but rather are personal commitments engraved in the hearts and souls of individuals who communicate their leadership through actions that challenge the status quo by seeing how life ought to be.When Darwin stepped off the Beagle and wrote his manuscripts, he gave scientists and business professionals the agency to think independently and drive innovation through collaboration rafter than obedience to dogma of the day. Through this platform, you have an opportunity to establish those relationships that allow you to understand more and see more of what John Salisbury observed in the 12th century by standing on the shoulders of giants, We see more, and things that are more distant, because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours.

Keynote Forum

Jerry Melbye

University of North Texas, USA

Keynote: A Historic Perspective on Forensic Science

Time : 09:25-09:50

OMICS International Forensic Research-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker  Jerry Melbye  photo
Biography:

Dr. Melbye completed his PhD at the University of Toronto where he taught for 35 years before transferring to Texas State University. While at Texas State, he created the worlds largest outdoor human decomposition research facility which has since become one of the most highly respected teaching facilities in the country for students and law enforcement. He is currently a Research Professor at the University of North Texas and Forensic Expert with The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences

Abstract:

Some authors have defined forensic science as the application of scientific disciplines to the analysis of evidence. While this is true in a sense, I have taken issue with the term “application” because it implies that we are applied scientists. In other words, we merely take innovations from real scientists and apply these to practical problems. In part this is true to some degree, but it further implies that we are not scientists who have original ideas and research goals. I have often defined forensic science as the recovery and analysis of evidence for presentation in courts of law. Yes, I have received criticism that my definition is too simplistic and does not name the various kinds of forensic science. As we are all aware, there are many disparate kinds of forensic science which I prefer to call sub-disciplines such as forensic entomology, odontology, pathology, botany, etc. All of these sub-disciplines are the parts of an academic discipline called forensic science which has a unifying paradigm. This is demonstrated by reviewing the basic assumptions, ways of thinking and methodology that are commonly accepted by our scientific community. These are exciting times. Gradually over the years universities have been developing Departments of Forensic Science. We are rearing a new generation of specialists that have a basic knowledge of the breadth of the field. In short, we have specialists in different fields that can talk to each other about problems and new ideas. When you think about it, thats what this conference is about.

Keynote Forum

Evangeline Barefoot

St. Davids Round Rock Medical Center, USA

Keynote: The Perception of research in sexual assault physical examinations

Time : 10:15-10:40

OMICS International Forensic Research-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Evangeline Barefoot photo
Biography:

Evangeline Barefoot has completed her Masters in Criminal Justice and her Bachelors Degree is in Nursing. She studied at Boston University and has served as a sexual assault nurse examiner in Texas for 22 years. She also serves as a consultant to the United States Air Force Judge Advocate Generals offices across the globe. She has published several articles on sexual assault examination procedures and taught healthcare providers in Texas for the Attorney Generals Office for six years. She maintains a practice caring for victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, and abuse.

Abstract:

Over the past several decades, evidenced based practice has become the gold standard for health science. Evidence based medical care has helped us to recognize, treat, and improve outcomes in all areas of medicine and nursing. This is an accepted belief. I also believe in evidenced based treatment. I am a sexual assault nurse examiner and forensic nurse. I have practiced my craft for more than twenty years and I have seen many changes in how we provide care and many more changes in how we interpret our findings in a legal setting. Most of the changes are at the behest of the criminal justice system (McLean, et al, 2011). Absent of physical evidence, eye witnesses, or collaboration by facts, the case often results in a he said, she said, stalemate and subsequently there is not enough evidence for a grand jury to issue an indictment. If an indictment is issued it is even less likely that, absent significant and compelling evidence, the jury will be firmly convinced beyond a reasonable doubt. With recent high profile events of sexual assault and interpersonal violence, there is increasing pressure to prove that a crime happened even when there is no physical evidence. This has led to an acceptance by many sexual assault examiners that evidence is not needed to prove contact let alone an assault. If current research is used as evidence based practice there is a significant danger of false interpretation.

  • 1.Forensic Psychology & Forensic Psychiatry
    6. Forensic Chemistry and Forensic Toxicology
    7. Wild life Forensics
Speaker

Chair

Ronn Johnson

University of San Diego, USA

Co-Chair

Mark Love

2 Dr. Johnsons Buildings, UK

Session Introduction

Ronn Johnson

University of San Diego, USA

Title: Clinical forensic implications for the DSM-5 Quadrant in JFSB

Time : 10:55-11:15

Speaker
Biography:

Ronn Johnson is licensed and board certified clinical psychologist with extensive experience in academic and clinical settings. Doctor Johnson is a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has served as a staff psychologist in community mental health clinics, hospitals, schools and university counseling centers. The University of Iowa, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Central Oklahoma, and San Diego State University are among the sites of his previous academic appointments. His forensic, scholarship, and teaching interests include: ethical-legal issues, police psychology, women death penalty, and contraterrorism.

Abstract:

Diagnostically, juvenile fire setters and bomb makers (JFSBs) present with a variety of behavioral (e.g., choice of ignition source, location, etc.), individual (biopsychosociocultural and temperament), and environmental factors (family structures) that must be assessed in relation to the fire setting behavior (Slavkin, 2000; Kolko, 2001). From a clinical forensic perspective, any subsequent evidence-based treatment recommendations for JFSBs are contingent upon the accuracy of the diagnosis. For example, the placement of high profile JFSB cases can be complicated by the diagnostic experience of the clinicians conducting the evaluations. Less than a handful of JFSB mental health programs across the country devote their full time efforts to exclusively working with these types of cases. Most clinicians have limited exposure to these cases or lack adequate training necessary for recognizing the public safety factors relevant in these cases. In some instances, probation departments seeking JFSB placements may experience considerable difficulty finding facilities qualified and willing to accept these cases. In addition, the psychological evaluations contain diagnoses that are plagued by problems with non-independent assessment of the JFSB case (i.e., relying on information contained in previous reports as opposed to independently establishing relevant psychological data points) or gaps in the forensically-relevant information obtained. Clarifying the diagnostic picture is only part of much larger forensically-relevant questions related to risk for future fire setting that is necessary for making evidence-based recommendations about placement. Because of the public safety risks and diverging psychological opinions on these JFSB cases, some probation departments are forced to consider extremely expensive inpatient long-term care for these youth. There is no one DSM mental disorder that can be appropriately used to capture all of the categorical or dimensional features associated with JFSB (Johnson, Killbourne & Beckenbach, 2013). Despite these caveats, forensic clinicians can reliably approach differentiating among the possible diagnostic subgroups of JFSB. This presentation discusses the DSM-5 Quadrant as an approach that may be used for the identification of the relevant and qualitatively distinct diagnostic variables for JFSBs (Johnson, 2013).

Speaker
Biography:

Lucy Love has been a Forensic Medical Examiner for 15 years and a Psychosexual counselor for 13 years. I am presently the Clinical Director of G4s Forensic and Medical Services and run a weekly Psycho-sexual Clinic within the NHS. I have written and published papers both in Forensic medical and Psycho-sexual journals.

Abstract:

The notes of 100 patients who attended a psycho-sexual clinic in the UK, between 2011 and 2013 were analyzed and the frequency as a percentage, with which sexual abuse or a sexual assault was disclosed, calculated. Patients with an obvious physical cause for their psycho-sexual problems, such as Diabetes were excluded. Patients presented with a wide range of psycho-sexual problems and the relationship between sexual abuse/ assault and the specific type of psycho-sexual problem was also explored. The results would support more financial investment into initial counseling and domestic/ sexual violence services to prevent the development of serious long-term psycho-sexual sequelae which are very costly to treat, both in terms of finance and clinic time .

Evangeline Barefoot

St. Davids Round Rock Medical Center, USA

Title: Management of the sexually assaulted patient: Utilization of the forensic survey

Time : 11:35-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Evangeline Barefoot is a Forensic Nurse Examiner/ Consultant at St. Davids Round Rock Medical Center. 23 years as a registered nurse with primary practice as trauma nurse and sexual assault nurse examiner/ forensic nurse. Recently completed a seven year contract with State of Texas as an instructor for sexual assault nurse examiners and is currently a content expert/ consultant for the U. S. Air Force in the area of sexual assault.

Abstract:

Sexual assault survivors often seek medical care and support at hospitals, doctors offices, and urgent care centers that are ill-equipped to care for the unique needs of this patient population. As more and more victims come forward seeking care, medical providers need to be prepared to meet their needs. The sexually assaulted patient is a trauma patient and should be treated likewise utilizing the well-accepted primary and secondary surveys as recommended by the Emergency Nurses Association. Following the primary and secondary surveys, the forensic survey should be considered so that careful forensic considerations can be made to insure that possible evidence and referrals to community resources can be utilized.

Linda Galvan

St Davids Georgetown Hospital, USA

Title: Have we done all we can do?

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Linda Galvan is a Forensic Nurse Examiner/Consultant at St. Davids Round Rock Medical Centre. 23 years as a registered nurse with primary practice as trauma nurse and sexual assault nurse examiner/forensic nurse. She is currently a content expert/ consultant for the US Air Force in the area of sexual assault.

Abstract:

Domestic violence and sexual assault continue to be a tremendous problem in not only in the United States, but internationally. Strangulation, one of the most violent acts of domestic violence, is often under reported and under treated. When the blood vessels and air passages contained within the neck are compressed, death can occur within 4-5 minutes. It takes only 4 pounds per square inch (psi) to block off the blood vessels in the neck. Twenty five percent of all traumatic deaths worldwide and ten percent of violent deaths in the Unites States occur from strangulation annually. Organizations such as National Family Justice Center, National Center on Domestic and Sexual Violence, Texas Council on Family Violence, and the Strangulation Training Institute, continue to work diligently to put domestic violence and strangulation issues on the map and increase awareness and funding for more programs. However Congress and State Legislation, continues to ignore the need for funding to support these programs. Women continue to die from domestic violence at the hands of their significant others daily. In 2012, 142 women died in the state of Texas from domestic violence. Have we done all we can do if 142 women die due to violence?

Speaker
Biography:

Michele I. Bracken is an Assistant Professor at Salisbury University, USA. She has completed her Ph.d at University of Maryland. Her research interest include Intimate Partner Violence, Domestic Violence, Breast Cancer, Womens Health Issues.

Abstract:

Intimate partner violence is of national concern, resulting in an annual 4.9 million intimate partner physical and sexual assaults occurring in the United States (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). Due to resulting traumatic injuries, the emergency department is an ideal setting to assess for patients in abusive relationships. Because of this, it is critical that emergency department nurses involved in the screening process have perceptions and attitudes conducive to identification, care, and appropriate referral, to ensure the safety of these patients. Research has shown that nurses are not always effective in screening for intimate partner violence (Glass, Dearwater, & Campbell, 2001; Wilson, Cesario, Fredland, Walsh, McFarlane, Gist, Malech, & Schultz, 2001). There is a paucity of research on the attitudes and perceptions of these nurses that may provide a basis for this ineffective screening. The purpose of this research was to determine the attitudes and perceptions of emergency department nurses in a rural mid-eastern hospital regarding their experiences in referring for and/or administering an instrument that assesses a patients risk for being murdered by an abusive partner. Results of 9 interviews determined there were three emerging themes: 1) Worthwhile assessment tool; 2) Barriers Encountered; and 3) Solutions to Barriers.

Speaker
Biography:

Branislav Filipovic is a full time professor of Anatomy in the School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia. He is the specialist of psychiatry, oriented towards the brain changes in psychiatric disorders, especially PTSD. Starting 2007, he is elected for a permanent court expert for psychiatry and war traumas. He published more than 30 papers concerning neuro anatomy and brain alterations in the psychiatric disorders

Abstract:

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often used as an excuse, for the war crimes defense in front of the court of the law. In our analysis of the 150 persons, accused for the war crimes in the war in former Yugoslavia, the results were as follows: Most of the evaluated war crime performers, 128 of them, suffered from the severe personality disorder, mostly antisocial, but also borderline and narcistic. They usually committed a crime that was documented by a photo or a video recording, as a kind of the trophy collecting proof.. Twelve of them were psychotic, whose crimes were committed without selection, e.g., three houses in a row, in one village, in the phase known as narrowing of the conscience, triggered by the war happenings. Two of them were had a delusional order from God to kill people from the different religion. Ten people committed a combat crime as the revenge for the prior loss of the family members. Eight of them showed no specific psychiatric pathology, but they were ordered to kill mostly the prisoners of war by a senior officer. Only two suffered from pronounced PTSD, who were firstly captured from the opposite side, and then released under the mediation of the Red Cross. Both were driven by an unexplainable impulse to protect themselves from another imprisoning by the opponent side, killed the imprisoned soldiers in the enemy uniforms. Definitely, PTSD suffering war veterans seldom commit war crimes, and, according to our experience, combat crimes were performed by a person suffering from serious personality disorder.

Break: Lunch Break 12:55-13:40 @ Texas E
Speaker
Biography:

Ronn Johnson is licensed and board certified clinical psychologist with extensive experience in academic and clinical settings. Doctor Johnson is a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has served as a staff psychologist in community mental health clinics, hospitals, schools and university counseling centers. The University of Iowa, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Central Oklahoma, and San Diego State University are among the sites of his previous academic appointments. His forensic, scholarship, and teaching interests include: ethical-legal issues, police psychology, women death penalty, and contraterrorism.

Abstract:

In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), the outline for Cultural Formulation (OCF) marked as an attempt to apply anthropological concepts within psychiatry. OCF was created to improve the clinicians interpretative abilities in diagnostic assessment and treatment. However, the feedback of the OCF has been mixed. Its vague format may not help clinicians to formulate specific questions. Additionally, it poses a question as to if it needs to form a separate assessment from the standard interview. In 2010, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup conducted a literature review on the OCF. It converted the OCF into the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) for clinicians in general outpatient clinical settings. The concept of using cultural formulation assessments promises to reveal knowledge about the cultural world view of patients, culturally normative and sanctioned health practices, and health systems that are critical for clinical care .The cultural formulation was developed to bridge the gap of the cultural differences between clinicians and their patients. The OCF has been considered as the most significant contribution to psychiatry, due to its emphasis on the patients subjective experience and conceptualization of illness. While the importance of culturally competent counselors in clinical practice has been established, the assessment of the impact these trained counselors have on a diverse population remains underdeveloped. Thus an important implication for the CFI on clinicians would be to enhance existing cultural competencies. A study by Aggarwal et al. (2013) investigated the barriers of implementing CFI in clinical practice. The results showed that the most frequent limitations for the CFI were lack of differentiation from other treatments, lack of buy-in ambiguity of design, over-standardization of the CFI, and severity of illness. In addition, the clinicians presented that the CFI is lack of conceptual relevance between intervention and problem, drift from the format, repetition, severity of patient illness and lack of clinician buy-in. The population of Asians, including those of more than one race, is estimated at 18.2 million in the United States in 2011. With this growing population and these limitations, we propose the following recommendations for use with Asian American populations: a greater focus on somatic symptoms, the impact cultural perspectives influence conceptualization of mental illness, and the impact of stigma and negative associations on symptom presentation. Through a poster presentation, we will discuss and evaluate cultural values of Asian American populations, the various barriers towards the implementation, application of the DSM-5 CFI to inform clinicians, and provide an approachable cultural assessment tool for generalized practice.

Gianni Gallello

University of Valencia, Spain

Title: Chemical element levels as a methodological tool in forensic science

Time : 14:00-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Gianni Gallello is an Italian researcher that has completed his PhD at the University of Valencia (Spain). He has been developing new methodological proposals since 2009 to overcome some scientific problems in different disciplines (forensic science, archaeology, biology and geology). Some of his results have been published in important indexed international Journals.

Abstract:

In many cases, a previous impact on the structure and chemical composition of the bones is induced by cremation during funerary rituals, accident and other human activities. In this study, we have created a statistical classification of carbonized and cremated bones, as well as bones exposed to unknown thermal conditions to identify the degree of burning and to control the impact of diagenesis throughout chemical element analysis. Major elements, trace elements and Rare Earth Elements (REEs, lanthanides) in cremations have been determinate employing ICP-OES. Samples from the inner part of their bones have been divided into carbonized indicating bones fired in reducing atmosphere, cremated for bones fired in oxidizing atmosphere and unknown for bones of unidentifiable burning. Furthermore, bone samples from the outer bone layer, unburned bones and soil samples have been analyzed. PCA have showed that bone samples obtained from the outer bone layer had a different elemental composition more similar to soil than samples of the inner bone layer. PLS-DA results obtained in this study have confirmed that changes in thermal conditions are associated to chemical transformations in the mineral part of the bones. When the thermal conditions in burned bones are uncertain or burned bones are environmentally contaminated, statistical tests may help to assess the condition of cremations according to the elemental profile of samples. The proposed method could be useful in forensic science investigations to select better preserved samples in different scenarios.

Speaker
Biography:

Surendra P. Goyal, M.Sc. and Ph.D. (Zoology) is working with the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun 248001, India for last 27 years. He worked on a number of species ranging from Fruit bats to elephant. Dr. Goyal is Nodal Officer, Wildlife Forensic Cell of the Institute. One of the important tasks is to develop protocols for species identification which is needed in implementation of national laws and International treaties. He has initiated a research work on Panthera tigris genome: Implications in forensics” mainly to establish reference genetic database to determine geographic origin of poaching cases and has immense global signficance. He has widely traveled across world to acquire new technologies for use in developing wildlife forensics and in other issues of wildlife conservation.

Abstract:

One of the major causes in failure of proper implementation of laws was lack of wildlife forensic facility to identify species from various wildlife parts and products for better conservation of resources in south-east Asia. We discuss outcome of the collaborative work undertaken in wildlife forensics with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services. 65 per cent cases in India can be dealt with morphometry based techniques as items were hair, skin, claws, antler, musk pod and bone. 40 per cent samples among hair were shawls of Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsoni) and we describe simple field criteria in distinguishing wool samples from other species. Of the ca. >300 wildlife offence cases related to tissue, we noted major problems were in proper preservation of samples and lack of reference samples. A simple manual and kit were prepared for proper preservation of tissue samples for enforcement officers. For dealing offences of tissue (n= > 300), Wildlife Forensic DNA facility was established to standardize techniques for identifying species from various animal parts. A need of standardizing protocols for extracting DNA from Wildlife Forensic materials was felt because of degraded samples and development of molecular markers. Of the four protocols tested for 30 meat samples, 10% samples showed very good quality DNA which resulted in RAPD amplification. 70% samples indicated degraded DNA whereas 20% samples yielded very less DNA which needs to be extracted again by modifying protocols. We also tested DNA protocols for other biological samples such as skin (n=6), hairs (n=10), bear bile (n=4), musk pod (n=4), antler (n=1), ivory (n=2) and blood (n=5). We initiated to establish DNA profile of Indian species (n=100) based on cytochrome b, 12s RNA and 16s RNA. We discuss the initiative undertaken for identifying source of origin of tiger leopard and elephant and sensitization among enforcement agencies.

Speaker
Biography:

Tom Smale completed his Bachelor of Forensic Science in 2011 from the Canberra Institute of Technology and his Bachelor of Psychology with Honours in 2005 from the Australian National University. He has previously worked with the Australian Federal Police Firearms ID & Armoury Team in a voluntary capacity and currently lectures are the Canberra Institute of Technology in Crime Scene Investigation, Communication in Forensic Science, Comparative Analysis and Court Procedures and Protocol. He has recently published his first journal article in the Australian Journal of Forensic Science.

Abstract:

Fire scene investigation can be aided by detecting the presence of chemical compounds native to commonly-used accelerants, such as petroleum. An accepted method for detecting these compounds involves the use of thermal desorption coupled with headspace sampling for extraction, followed by chemical analysis using Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (GC-MS). This procedure traditionally requires the transport of debris to a laboratory, which presents a problem when attempting to extract accelerant residue from fixed surfaces within a scene. Over the past three years multiple studies have been conducted at the Canberra Institute of Technology using a custom-made Passive Headspace Residue Extraction Device (PHRED) to create an isolated headspace within a target region of the fire scene, without causing heat damage to the scene itself. Studies have involved sampling the headspace via activated charcoal and Solid Phase Microextraction and subsequent analysis via GC-MS. The results of these various studies have found this technique to be a viable, non-destructive approach for chemical compound extraction and collection.

Ward Allen

SDFI-TeleMedicine, USA

Title: Secure digital forensic imaging (SDFI)

Time : 15:00-15:20

Biography:

Ward Allen completed a Business Communications Certificate from Ryerson Polytechnic University in Toronto, Canada in 1993 and was awarded his Bachelor of Business Administration from Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York in 2003. Between 1992 and 2002, Mr. Allen worked for various imaging companies including Polaroid Corporation in both Canada and the United States. In 2003, Mr. Allen founded SDFI-TeleMedicine in Los Angeles, California then moved the company to the Las Vegas area where the company continues thrive after 11 years creating and supporting secure digital forensic imaging solutions for various industries.

Abstract:

Secure Digital Forensic Imaging (SDFI) is used as a legal process that utilizes photographic capture devices, image management software tools and software encryption technologies. These three primary elements of secure digital forensic imaging continue to evolve independently of each other. Most forensic photographers have embraced the advancing technology by moving away from film based capture devices and into digital capture devices, however, cell phone cameras and most point and shoot devices lack the ability to capture RAW files or capture viable depth of field, key elements within the Secure Digital Forensic Imaging process. Additionally, an expert in photography is not, by default an expert with computers or an expert with encryption tools. Digital forensic images must legible, be secured from unnecessary access and protected from tampering to be legally viable.

Speaker
Biography:

Ronn Johnson is licensed and board certified clinical psychologist with extensive experience in academic and clinical settings. Doctor Johnson is a Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has served as a staff psychologist in community mental health clinics, hospitals, schools and university counseling centers. The University of Iowa, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Central Oklahoma, and San Diego State University are among the sites of his previous academic appointments. His forensic, scholarship, and teaching interests include: ethical-legal issues, police psychology, women death penalty, and contra terrorism.

Abstract:

In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), the outline for Cultural Formulation (OCF) marked as an attempt to apply anthropological concepts within psychiatry. OCF was created to improve the clinician’s interpretative abilities in diagnostic assessment and treatment. However, the feedback of the OCF has been mixed. Its vague format may not help clinicians to formulate specific questions (Aggarwal et al., 2013; Martinez, 2009). Additionally, it poses a question as to if it needs to form a separate assessment from the standard interview (Aggarwal, 2012). In 2010, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup conducted a literature review on the OCF. It converted the OCF into the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) for clinicians in general outpatient clinical settings. The concept of using cultural formulation assessments promises to reveal knowledge about the cultural world view of patients, culturally normative and sanctioned health practices, and health systems that are critical for clinical care (Martínez, 2009). The cultural formulation was developed to bridge the gap of the cultural differences between clinicians and their patients (Rohlof, Knipscheer, & Kleber, 2009). The OCF has been considered as the most significant contribution to psychiatry, due to its emphasis on the patient’s subjective experience and conceptualization of illness (Jenkins, 2007; Aggarwal et al., 2013). While the importance of culturally competent counselors in clinical practice has been established, the assessment of the impact these trained counselors have on a diverse population remains underdeveloped (Martinez, 2009). Thus an important implication for the CFI on clinicians would be to enhance existing cultural competencies. A study by Aggarwal et al. (2013) investigated the barriers of implementing CFI in clinical practice. The results showed that the most frequent limitations for the CFI were lack of differentiation from other treatments, lack of buy-in ambiguity of design, over-standardization of the CFI, and severity of illness. In addition, the clinicians presented that the CFI is lack of conceptual relevance between intervention and problem, drift from the format, repetition, severity of patient illness and lack of clinician buy-in. The population of Asians, including those of more than one race, is estimated at 18.2 million in the United States in 2011 (CDC, 2013). With this growing population and these limitations, we propose the following recommendations for use with Asian American populations: a greater focus on somatic symptoms, the impact cultural perspectives influence conceptualization of mental illness, and the impact of stigma and negative associations on symptom presentation. Through a poster presentation, we will discuss and evaluate cultural values of Asian American populations, the various barriers towards the implementation, application of the DSM-5 CFI to inform clinicians, and provide an approachable cultural assessment tool for generalized practice.

S P Goyal

Wildlife Institute of India, India

Title: Genetic structure of tiger populations in India and its significance in forensics

Time : 15:40-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Surendra P. Goyal, M.Sc. and Ph.D. (Zoology) is working with the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun 248001, India for last 27 years. He worked on a number of species ranging from Fruit bats to elephant. Dr. Goyal is Nodal Officer, Wildlife Forensic Cell of the Institute. One of the important tasks is to develop protocols for species identification which is needed in implementation of national laws and International treaties. He has initiated a research work on Panthera tigris genome: Implications in forensics” mainly to establish reference genetic database to determine geographic origin of poaching cases and has immense global signficance. He has widely traveled across world to acquire new technologies for use in developing wildlife forensics and in other issues of wildlife conservation.

Abstract:

The goal of tiger conservation is to maintain sufficiently large populations of each subspecies in its natural habitat that ensured high probabilities of long term survival. Poaching for illegal trade is a serious threat across its range. Success in tiger conservation is to curtail global trafficking in tiger parts and products. Development of genetic tools has enabled tracking poaching of endangered species to their source population. Project is aimed at establishing genotyping data profile of tiger population in India and use for tracking poaching cases to its geographic origin. We examined genetic structure of tigers based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA using scat samples collected from tiger reserves and tissue samples. Mitochondrial DNA data indicates unique haplotype in cytochrome b gene, which was used to differentiate population from northern (Rajaji to Pakke Tiger Reserves) to rest of the tiger populations. A major challenge in developing genotyping profile from nuclear DNA is to identify suitable microsatellite loci which are suitable for poor to good quality scat samples, therefore, we screened 60 loci. Of these, 26 loci ranged from moderate to good for using them on such samples that were <200 bp. We examined genetic structure of samples collected from Rajaji-Corbett Population (RC), Ranthambhore Tiger Reserve (RTR), Buxa Tiger Reserve (BTR), Central India (CI) and zoo (Z) tiger populations. The mean observed heterozygosity ranged 0.28 to 0.69 and was in the order of CI>RC>BTR>Z>RTR. The observed mean effective allele per locus ranged 1.53 to 3.76 with the highest in RC population. Fst values for population structuring indicates a population differentiation from moderate to high among examined populations and observed values (Fst>0.033) are suitable for Bayesian based population assignment. Genetic variation within population was c.82%, where as, among population was 18%. We discuss population assignment based on Bayesian approach for tracking tiger poaching.

Abbassi Salah-Eddine

Worldwide Association of Women Forensic Experts, France

Title: Children terrorists, children in danger or dangerous?

Time : 16:00-16:20

Speaker
Biography:

Abbassi Salah-Eddine is a Ph.D. student at EHESS in Paris. His research interest includes: Terrorism researcher, criminology research & victimology, together with clinical criminology and socio-criminology on variety of topics: the victims of forced marriages, terrorism and fundamentalism and any other form of marginalization, deviant or delinquent behaviours concerning the youth born of immigration, as well as judicial psychology, private security and fire safety

Abstract:

Having grown up within the armed terrorist groups, their only references are those warriors who call themselves mujahidin against the "taghout" here is the unique model of life they know. A life of a fugitive wild where terror reigns. It is in this perspective that we try to think of a criminological point of view the following problem Your little assess their dangerousness They are predisposed to adapt to civilian life? How can accompany Are they children in danger or dangerous? What treatment is best suited to their situation‎ introduction‎ they are often treated as children of terrorists, suicide bombers, or bad seed. This systematic ‎stigmatization excluded from the civil society. Besides these children are primarily seen as the ‎girls son, or sister they are recognized through their terrorist father treated as such, whether ‎or not repented not to their own person. This societal phenomenon can only fuel the cycle of ‎violence (Violence creates violence). Their predisposition to victim genes factors (age, ‎physical or mental vulnerability, etc.) while they undergo the hatred of former victims of ‎terrorism, and must pay somehow the price of impunity for crimes of their parents they are not ‎responsible.

Break: Coffee Break 16:20-16:35 @ Ballroom Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Ji Youn Cindy Kim is a Masters of Arts candidate for Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of San Diego in San Diego, California. Her clinical and research interests are in children and adolescents with issues related to trauma and Posttraumatic stress disorder.

Abstract:

Juvenile fire setting or juvenile arson has been identified as the fastest growing fire public safety threat in the United States today. It is responsible for more than 50% of arson arrests which are juveniles. These individuals are responsible for 80,000 structure fires, including 300 deaths and 1.2 billion dollars in property damage. Responding to the needs of juvenile offenders with co-occurring psychological issues constitute a legitimate public safety decision making concern for correctional administrators and mental health providers. Youth arrested for arson and other fire-related crimes are often remanded into the juvenile justice system (i.e., through juvenile court). A prudent public safety course of action involves finding ways to deal with the myriad of challenges posed by Juvenile Fire Setters and Bomb makers (JFSB). These efforts warrant relying upon both empirically based findings that provide guidance towards developing a best-practice model. Forensic mental health providers can play a key role in improving the care of youth and their families while they are in these secure facilities. As an intervention philosophy, therapeutic jurisprudence may be of great assistance. These intervention efforts are largely implemented through the partnerships between juvenile justice care facilities and forensic mental health providers. The primary goal is to have a reasonable public safety impact that assists both the youth and the community. This presentation examines clinical forensic issues associated with delivering JFSB services in secure facilities. Some attention is devoted to exploring the need for a strong interdisciplinary relationship (e.g., fire service, forensic mental health providers, and juvenile justice). Clinical and forensic recommendations that serve as treatment guidelines for incarcerated youth are also discussed

Biography:

Eric Jacobs is a student of University of San Diego Clinical Mental Health, USA

Abstract:

Forensic mental health specialists have an ethical and legal obligation to develop assessment and culturally responsive treatment protocols that take into account the full range of symptoms that reflect underlying psychopathology. These symptoms are most often assessed using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The DSM-5 is the most commonly used diagnostic reference for mental health practitioners and the recency of the current edition makes it necessary to reevaluate how it can be used with juvenile forensic cases, particularly with respect to criminal responsibility. This is especially relevant when public safety behaviors such as juvenile fire setting or bomb making (JFSB). From a forensic treatment standpoint, the motivations for JFSB are more likely than not to stem from psychopathology that must be accurately identified and disentangled from other risk and other vulnerability factors. The DSM-5 is an assessment tool that provides detailed information regarding the types of symptoms, behavioral characteristics, and serves as a starting point for potential treatments for a wide range mental health diagnoses that occur internationally. There are four DSM-5 diagnostic symptomatology patterns that are commonly observed with juvenile fire setters. These overlapping diagnostic patterns are referred to as the JFSB DSM-5 Quadrant. When developing assessments for juveniles, forensic mental health specialists must demonstrate the competencies necessary to determine what particular clinical features of these four JFSB-relevant disorders may be present in these juveniles. As with adults, juveniles with psychological disorders could be determined as not being responsible for committing a crime (e.g., fire setting or bomb making). It is imperative to explore how the disorders commonly seen in JFSB could impact criminal responsibility. This presentation explores JFSB, DSM-5 Quadrant and criminal responsibility.

Biography:

Christine Collins is student at Alliant International University, USA

Abstract:

Juvenile fire setting and bomb making (JFSB) has a significant public safety and fiscal costs associated with it. Juvenile fire setting behavior goes far beyond a simple designation as “curiosity” for the youth involved in these incidents. Instead, the behavior is often a manifestation of more expanded forensically relevant psychological issues (e.g., risk assessment level and motivation). If appropriate inventions are utilized when the behaviors are identified in the early stages, then the juvenile fire setting behavior can be the primary focus of the evidenced based interventions (e.g., FATJAM). Over the past few decades an increasing amount of research has been collected in this area, and it has become apparent that one of the important factors in achieving success for these juveniles is a healthy involvement of a parent or legal guardian. Parental endorsement or denial of the fire setting behavior can impact the progress of a childs towards controlling unwanted JFSB behavior. At the same time, parents/legal guardians provide forensic mental health professionals with important information as to the role fire setting behavior may play in the broader clinical picture of the juvenile. Therefore, while the relationship between the juvenile and the mental health professional remains a priority, working with the parent or guardian is also concomitant intervention variable that must be pursued in an effort to achieve the desired clinical forensic outcomes with JFSBs. This presentation will identify and explore strategies for forensic psychologists may use when working with the parents or guardians of JFSBs. Current research will be examined, while also reviewing and identifying suggestions as to where improvements can be made.

Biography:

Michelle Jimenez is a University of San Diego, USA

Abstract:

Juvenile fire setters and bomb makers (JFSB) constitute an increasing public safety concern. Forensic psychological and clinical settings have relied heavily on assessment measures and various clinical tools while delivering pre-treatment and screening services that are designed to help deal with various JFSB issues. Research has led to evidenced based treatment programs like FATJAM that are often used to reduce destructive behavior and recidivism (i.e., threats to public safety). The traditional treatment of juveniles has been to use more of a reactive approach within those same clinical forensic settings. Motivation has been identified as being a critical intervention component for changing an individuals unwanted behavior. This presentation aims to discuss how a motivational therapy orientation may be used to provide therapeutically-relevant changes in JFSBs. The presentation also reviews the use of pre-treatment groups that emphasize motivational therapy as a therapeutically-relevant strategy. The overall objective is to explain how pre-treatment motivational groups can result in desirable clinical changes (i.e., measured by subsequent risk assessments) by focusing on biopsychosociocultural factors through FATJAM interventions that incorporate a motivational group therapy component within a psychological forensic setting.

Biography:

Jessica Mueller is psychology student at Alliant International University, USA

Abstract:

Fires and bombs created by juveniles has become an increasing public safety matter over the last two decades. Annually in the United States, juveniles are responsible for 46% of all fires and bombs. The consequences of these actions include 300 fire-related deaths and 1.2 billion dollars in property damage. In order to reduce these troublesomepublic safety statistics, programs have been created to assess and treat juvenile fire setters and bomb makers. The Forensic Assessment & Therapeutic Jurisprudence Assistance Model (FATJAM) is an evidenced based intervention model that targets juveniles who set fires and create bombs. Although programs similar to FATJAM have made impact on reducing fire setting and bomb making behaviors, there remain juveniles refusing and withdrawing from forensic services. Efforts have been made to reduce the number of juveniles refusing and withdrawing from treatment, however many clinical forensic programs are still observing a rise in these numbers. In order to understand how and why the refusal and withdrawal of forensic psychological evaluation and treatment for these individuals continues to occur. This presentation will focus on the biopsychosociocultural risk factors associated with juvenile fire setters and bomb makers. In addition, there will be a review ofJuvenile Fire Setter and Bomb Maker (JFSB) behaviors and how it relates to the refusal and/or withdrawal from forensic psychological evaluation and treatment. Specific forensic mental health statistics will be shared in order to illustrate the scope of the JFSB noncompliance issues found in these clinical forensic service programs.

Break: 18:15-19:15 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Forensic Research @ Texas E